China energy mix history – China coal consumption now half global total

The BP Statistical Review of World Energy is out earlier this year – Wattsupwiththat have an article – Despite the hype, ‘carbon-free’ energy sources aren’t gaining traction globally. Using the BP numbers this is the history of the Chinese energy mix 1965-2013.

Below is an update of the global carbon dioxide emissions numbers to 2013 – showing a lessening of China growth. My post Oct 2013 after BP data came out.

7 comments to China energy mix history – China coal consumption now half global total

  • mobihci

    haha, so it took china less than a year to INCREASE their emissions by australias entire constant yearly release!

    so if australia went back to the stone age and used no transport, baseload power generation etc, then china will have filled that decrease in world emissions within a year, and would not stop increasing. well that is not quite true, australia would in turn stop buying chinese crap because we would have no money and we wouldnt be able to extract the coal we sell etc, so we would affect chinas sales a little at least until such time china signs new contracts for coal elsewhere.

  • Yes our emissions pale to insignificance alongside the majors. Then there is the issue that our own landmass soaks it all up anyway –
    www.warwickhughes.com/blog/?p=3036#comments

  • ianl8888

    China has a population of around 1.3 billion

    In the last 20 years or so, they have lifted over 300 million people out of abject poverty (I have witnessed the depth of that poverty many times). This has never been done before in human history – it’s actually astonishing in its’ energy, vitality and scope

    But that still leaves around 1 billion to go

    If the Chinese authorities stumble around too long or halt now, the resulting conflagration will make Mao’s Great Walk look like a Sunday school picnic

    It cannot be done without continuously extending affordable access to a reliable base load. On the scale needed, China’s considerable domestic deposits of good quality thermal coal are an irreplaceable and major element in this process. Piously wishing it was not so is utterly pointless

  • Check out this from the CSIRO, looks at odds with similar Chinese research posted at CO2 science: pindanpost.com/2014/06/22/fact-checking-csiros-impending-food-crisis/ on wheat yields with enhanced CO2 in the atmosphere.

  • Graeme No.3

    Tom Harley:

    Re the link: I started with the CSIRO who working from the assumption that rising CO2 MUST be bad, and finding that it enhanced plant growth, made another assumption that this would cause much higher temperature, and coupled with another assumption that rising temperatures would cause less water to evaporate managed to “prove” that rising CO2 will lead to lower crop yields, as they wanted to do all along.

    I am not sure if that is too many ASSumptions or merely too many ASSes.

  • That’s very funny Graeme No.3, I once used to look up to CSIRO when I was in the rural industry 30 years ago and longer, it is a shadow of what it once was. I’m not surprised about the way this story at SNWA was written either, as I see Kerry Faulkner is often spouting climate rubbish on Landline, farmers must cringe at times I’m sure, just as I do. I assume it’s the same Kerry but I stand to be corrected.
    Now, where have those carbon credits of mine gone?

  • I see Bloomberg have a story – Chinese coal consumption to peak in 2024 -
    www.rtcc.org/2014/07/01/chinese-coal-power-to-peak-in-2024-bloomberg/

    they also say -
    China will add 1000GW of renewables by 2030
    both predictions look a bit rosy to me.

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