Warmists spat over CSIRO sacking noted Oceanographer

I see this reported in the Canberra Times – “Scientist’s services no longer required”. Of course the article gives little idea as to what the good Dr. Trevor McDougall has done to fall out with top CSIRO pooh-bahs.
Does any reader have a clue ? Google has a lot of refs but just now my internet is only half of dialup so it is too slow to search myself.
Added 25th: The print copy of the CT quotes un-named people at the Max Planck Institute and NOAA / Princeton U – as writing to the CSIRO and Fed politicians in support of Dr. McDougall.
But I note “A PhD project to improve the accuracy of climate models”
and also “Redefinition of “seawater” to aid climate research” – both of these areas could be minefields if you were in any slight way lacking in appropriate pro-IPCC sensitivities.

8 comments to Warmists spat over CSIRO sacking noted Oceanographer

  • [...] Warmists spat over CSIRO sacking noted Oceanographer [...]

  • Graeme Inkster

    Surely this quote from him shows why.
    “The key to being a good oceanographer is to think differently from everyone else. If you think the same as everyone else, you can get papers published and you can have a reasonable career. But to think differently means that you may come up with quite original ideas that may change oceanographic practice forever”.

    Obviously anyone who thinks differently isn’t going to regurgitate the same old line. Dangerous stuff THINKING, it could lead to wondering if certain authorities are right.

  • val majkus

    Prince Albert I medal recipient 2011

    Dr. Trevor McDougall, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Hobart, Australia, is the Prince Albert 1 Medal recipient 2011: “For his outstanding work on (1) important and fundamental problems of ocean fluid dynamics over the full range of ocean scales, and (2) the thermodynamic properties of seawater”.

    Dr Trevor McDougall is internationally known for his work on important and fundamental problems of oceanic fluid dynamics covering all ocean scales. These include many aspects of double-diffusive convection, the definition of neutral density surfaces in relation to the movement of mesoscale eddies, and the way in which mesoscale mixing processes should be represented in ocean models. To faithfully represent the ocean in climate models, it is necessary to incorporate elements of ocean thermodynamics as described by McDougall’s work. Most recently, he led a SCOR/IAPSO team of chemists, physical oceanographers and modelers in redefining the thermodynamic properties of seawater, an interest stemming from his own work on the accurate treatment of heat in the ocean-climate system. This recent work strengthens even further the brilliant and unique contributions Trevor McDougall has made to oceanic science. He is a most worthy recipient of the Prince Albert I Medal.

    iapso.iugg.org/medals-and-awards/the-prince-albert-i-medal

  • What a disgrace for the once mighty and impeccable CSIIRO.

  • mobihci

    the CSIRO is infested with green so this guy must have said or done something wrong.

    www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/csiro-denies-its-head-megan-clark-has-any-conflict-of-interest-over-carbon-store-role/story-fn59niix-1226170818106

    It was revealed in Senate estimates today that the peak science body’s chief executive Megan Clark is the director of Cradle Mountain Carbon Pty Ltd and is also on the board of Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

    Cradle Mountain Carbon Pty Ltd is a private family company that sets aside land to store carbon as part of efforts to combat climate change.

    Liberal senator David Bushby said at the very least the public perception of Dr Clark’s additional appointments “should raise conflict of interest concerns”.

    CSIRO’s acting chief executive Mike Whelan said Dr Clark, who was absent from today’s hearing, was an officer of the highest integrity and the organisation’s board believed there was no conflict of interest issue.

    www.csiro.au/Portals/About-CSIRO/Who-we-are/Executive/Executive-Team/MikeWhelan.aspx

    Background
    Before becoming Deputy Chief Executive, from 2002-07, Mr Whelan held the position of Chief Finance Officer and Executive Director Operations where he was responsible for CSIRO’s Finance, Risk and Audit, Property and Information Management Technology groups.

    Prior to joining CSIRO, Mr Whelan was:

    Chief Operating Officer of Medibank Private from 1999-2002
    Chief Finance Officer of Medibank Private from 1997-99
    Chief Finance Officer of the Health Insurance Commission from 1996-97.

  • John Bromhead

    Jim Salinger of South Hobart, Tasmania writes to the Canberra Times (Letters, December 27) of reading about Trevor McDougall’s redundancy with extreme disappointment and links it to events in his own past. “In 2009, I was summarily dismissed from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research”.
    Added 27 Dec Ed. – John – the Canberra Times has the letter online;
    He goes on to blow his own trumpet with a quote from a The New Zealand Herald editorial at the time.
    “Clearly matters have gone too far when scientists speak of fleeing institutes because of the draconian rules. And they have gone way too far when a scientist who is arguably, NIWA’s top asset is dismissed for what, according to the institute itself is a matter of the utmost triviality”.

    He goes on to state “this is a dark day for CSIRO science indeed. Those engaged in the activity in CSIRO are slaves of the system”.

    He continues to toot as he completes his letter with “I hope that sense will prevail and that the very talented McDougall will be picked up by a top Australian university or elsewhere, where he will have the freedom to continue his valuable contribution to oceanic science. That is what happened to me”.

  • val majkus

    to add to the confusion

    Yesterday The Canberra Times’ Rosslyn Beeby broke the story that “oceanographer Trevor McDougall, has been made redundant by the CSIRO, drawing a stinging letter of rebuke from top international scientists”.

    In anything but diplomatic terminology the letter said that CSIRO is ”relinquishing its responsibility” to global climate science and is ”taking definitive steps towards mediocrity” by abandoning ”high-impact research”. The letter was prompted by the 30 November 2011 dismissal of Dr. Trevor McDougall who is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, a CSIRO Chief Research Scientist and winner of this year’s Prince Albert I Medal, an award given once every two years., It was awarded to Dr McDougall: “For his outstanding work on (1) important and fundamental problems of ocean fluid dynamics over the full range of ocean scales, and (2) the thermodynamic properties of seawater”. The committee in making the award noted: “To faithfully represent the ocean in climate models, it is necessary to incorporate elements of ocean thermodynamics as described by McDougall’s work… [His] recent work strengthens even further the brilliant and unique contributions Trevor McDougall has made to oceanic science. He is a most worthy recipient of the Prince Albert I Medal.”

    In a request by Ms Beeby to “please explain” she was told that CSIRO must focus on science that delivers ”the greatest national benefit”. and in further comment she reports:

    The chief of CSIRO’s marine and atmospheric research division, Bruce Mapstone, said the agency supported and valued Dr McDougall’s work. ”We are very pleased that Trevor will retain a link with the CSIRO as an honorary fellow and continue to work with his colleagues … CSIRO works in areas of science that answer the big contemporary questions for Australia and the world. Our science mission means making decisions about areas to grow and areas to reduce so we remain focused on addressing those issues that ultimately result in the greatest national benefit,” Dr Mapstone said.§

    Australia’s Chief Scientist, former ANU vice-chancellor Ian Chubb wouldn’t comment on the matter except to tell Ms Beeby that it was ”time for Australia to show the rest of the world we do value our scientists as highly regarded citizens and contributors to our future”, and that a national overhaul of potential science career paths was ”long overdue”. He also warned a report on the state of Australian science, being compiled by his office and due for publication early next year, ”is not likely to paint a pretty picture”.

    Dr McDougall’s dismissal should darken the cracking varnish considerably.

    Ms Beeby also sought the views of CSIRO Staff Association president Michael Borgas who told her the redundancy of such an internationally regarded scientist sent a message that science ”is not a secure career in this country”. It suggested successful scientists were not valued or rewarded, and ”success has become an occupational hazard at CSIRO”.

    So far the Australian Academy of Science and its president, Suzanne Cory, have remained silent regarding Dr. McDougall’s dismissal. One wonders how the Academy might have reacted had the first woman in radio astronomy, Ruby Payne-Scott, been its president. Her battle with Ian Clunies Ross in regard to the position of women, and particularly married women, in CSIRO as of the 1950’s is memorable*.

    www.the-funneled-web.com/N&V_2011(Jan-Dec)/N&V_1112/news__views_item_dec_2011-111225a.htm

  • val majkus

    couldn’t find an appropriate post – but if you want to review the First Order Draft of the WGI contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), Climate Change 2013
    here’s the spot to register
    fod.ipcc.unibe.ch/registration/

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